How to Make Your ‘Thank You’ Really Count

Written by Dallas Travers, CEC

Let’s kick this week’s post off with a question I received from an actress named Maria:

“I was dancing for a hit TV show last week and was lucky enough to work in a small, intimate scene alongside the show’s director/producer and lead actor. I’d like to write a note to the director, thanking him for the amazing day but I’m wondering what else (if anything) I could add in.

Do you recommend I insert a line about setting up a ten minute meeting to learn more about him?  Also, since MANY dancers pass through the show, would it be beneficial to include a photo business card in the note?”

The answer is simple… No and no.

Keep a thank you a thank you. Always. Don’t muddy the waters and take away from your sincerity by saying “Thank you and … I want something from you.” You can always follow up later on about your question. Trust that every attempt to reach out doesn’t have to be action related. Say thank you and leave it at that.

When you truly come from a place of gratitude, your relationship can grow deeper and last longer.  And you will be remembered for your thoughtfulness. Don’t forget that Thank You are the two most important words in your marketing vocabulary.


The Right Way to Say Thank You

I just heard from an actress named Carrie who reached out in such an honest way with great results. She recently created a target list of producers that she wants to work with. She saw one of those producers would be attending an event she was going to, so she wrote him a thank you note BEFORE the event. She sent this note without a picture or any contact info. Just the note.

Then, after the event, she sent another simple thank you to him with her specific takeaways from the event. A few days later, he found her number and called to thank HER for her notes.  He wanted to know what she was up to, and they set up a meeting to discuss her career.

This shows you just how powerful a simple thank you really is. You don’t need to send a thank you card on a piece of marketing or include your picture. If they want to connect with you, they will.

So if you’re nervous about how to write a compelling thank you without sounding fake, here is a simple guideline.

Be Specific.

Make sure you are saying thank you for something specific, like Carrie did. If you attended a casting workshop, for example, mention one takeaway you enjoyed from their presentation. Maybe it’s their sense of humor. Or their candor about the casting process. Think about what you learned and thank them for that.

As people, we all enjoy feeling appreciated, and industry folk are no different. Be very specific about what you are grateful for and send it out with no strings attached. This way leaves the space for something even better to come of it than what you may have planned to ask for.

So, today, get in the practice of expressing gratitude, simply and cleanly. Say thank you for no reason. Send a card every week to someone. You could even send one anonymously. Just the mere act of being grateful does wonders for you as well as others.



Respected as one of the entertainment industry’s leading experts, Dallas Travers teaches actors the career and life skills often left out of traditional training programs. Her groundbreaking book, The Tao of Show Business, has won over five awards including first prizes at The Hollywood Book Festival and the London Festival along with the National Indie Excellence Award. She has helped thousands of actors to increase their auditions, produce their own projects, secure representation and book roles in film and television.

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