“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” Actor Biographies

DANIEL RADCLIFFE has starred in the title role in all of the blockbuster films based on J.K. Rowling’s best-selling Harry Potter books.

Currently, he is starring as J. Pierrepont Finch in the Tony-nominated Broadway revival of “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” which marks his first Broadway musical. The show is directed and choreographed by Tony Award winner Rob Ashford. Radcliffe’s work in the show has brought him a number of acting honors, including the awards for Favorite Actor in a Musical and Favorite Onstage Pair (with John Larroquette) at the Broadway.com Audience Awards, as well as a BroadwayWorld.com Award for Best Leading Actor in a Musical. For his performance as Finch, he has also received nominations for Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, Drama League, and Fred and Adele Astaire Awards.

In 2008, Radcliffe made his Broadway debut as Alan Strang in Peter Shaffer’s play “Equus,” winning the award for Best Leading Actor at the BroadwayWorld.com Awards, as well as Best Leading Actor and Breakthrough Performance Awards at the Broadway.Com Audience Awards. He also garnered both Drama League and Drama Desk nominations for his work in the play. The year before, Radcliffe earned critical acclaim when he first starred as Alan Strang in the London revival of “Equus,” which marked his West End debut. Both the London and Broadway productions of “Equus” were directed by Thea Sharrock and also starred Tony Award winner Richard Griffiths.

On the screen, Radcliffe will next star in the horror thriller “The Woman in Black,” directed by James Watkins and slated to be released on January 20. His other film credits include the Australian independent feature “December Boys,” and the title role of Jack Kipling in the true-life telefilm “My Boy Jack.”
Radcliffe first appeared on screen as the young David Copperfield in the BBC/PBS presentation of the classic Charles Dickens novel. He then catapulted to fame when he won the coveted part of the boy wizard in 2001’s “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” Over the past decade, he reprised his role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.” He brought his portrayal of Harry Potter to a close in the two-part “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.”

On television, Radcliffe lent his voice to the character of a brooding vampire named Edmund on “The Simpsons – Treehouse of Horror XXI” special. He also made a guest appearance as himself in the award-winning BBC/HBO series “Extras,” starring Ricky Gervais.

 

 

RUPERT GRINT has starred as Ron Weasley, Harry Potter’s classmate and loyal best friend in all of the Harry Potter films.

Upcoming, Grint stars in the World War II drama “Comrade,” about British and German soldiers who are stranded in the Norwegian wilderness and must form an unlikely friendship in order to survive. Directed by Peter Næss, the film is shooting on location in Norway and is slated for release in 2012. Grint also stars in the independent horror thriller “Cross Country.” Last fall, he starred with Bill Nighy and Emily Blunt in Jonathan Lynn’s independent action comedy “Wild Target,” playing a young man who is apprenticed to someone he believes is a private detective, but who is really a hit man.

Grint made his professional acting debut when he won the role of Ron Weasley in 2001’s “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” His performance in that film brought him a British Film Critics’ Circle Award nomination for Best Newcomer and a Young Artist Award for Most Promising Newcomer. He went on to star in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.” He played Ron Weasley for the last time in both parts of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” the final title in the blockbuster franchise.

In 2006, the UK’s leading film magazine, Empire, presented Grint, Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson with the prestigious Outstanding Contribution Award in recognition of their performances in all of the Harry Potter movies.

Grint’s other film credits include Peter Hewitt’s “Thunderpants,” alongside Simon Callow, Stephen Fry and Paul Giamatti; Jeremy Brock’s “Driving Lessons, with Julie Walters and Laura Linney; and the indie film “Cherrybomb,” which screened to critical acclaim at film festivals in the UK and Europe.

 

EMMA WATSON has starred as Hermione Granger, devoted friend to both Harry Potter and Ron Weasley, in all of the Harry Potter films. She completed her portrayal of the character in the two-part “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.”

Watson made her professional acting debut, at the age of 10, in the first Harry Potter film, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” winning a Young Artist Award for Best Leading Young Actress for her performance. Watson also garnered two Critics’ Choice Award nominations from the Broadcast Film Critics Association, for her work in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” Additionally, the readers of Total Film magazine also voted her Best New Performer for her work in the former. More recently, Watson was nominated for a 2011 Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Award, and earned an Empire Award nomination for Best Actress for her performance in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

She will next be seen in Simon Curtis’ “My Week with Marilyn,” with Eddie Redmayne and Michelle Williams. Watson stars as a costume assistant named Lucy in the drama, which chronicles a week in the life of Marilyn Monroe during the making of 1957’s “The Prince and the Showgirl.”

Watson is currently filming “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” written and directed by Stephen Chbosky and shooting on location in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Watson stars in the role of Samantha in the film, based on Chbosky’s own coming-of-age novel and centering on the trials and tribulations of a 15-year-old outsider named Charlie.

Watson was previously heard as the voice of Princess Pea in the 2008 animated adventure “The Tale of Despereaux.” She also starred in the role of Pauline Fossil, opposite Victoria Wood, Richard Griffiths and Emilia Fox, in the BBC’s television drama “Ballet Shoes.”

Apart from acting, Watson has worked closely with Fair Trade and organic clothing producer People Tree in helping create a new teenage fashion line. Earlier this year, she also collaborated with Alberta Ferretti on an organic Pure Threads collection.

Watson was recently announced as the new face of Lancôme, following in the footsteps of Penélope Cruz, Kate Winslet and Julia Roberts in becoming the image for the celebrated brand.

 

HELENA BONHAM CARTER plays Death Eater and fanatical Lord Voldemort devotee Bellatrix Lestrange. She originated the role in the 2007 hit “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and also played Bellatrix in “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

A two-time Academy Award® nominee, Bonham Carter earned her most recent Oscar® nod for her performance in 2010’s award-winning, true-life drama “The King’s Speech,” directed by Tom Hooper. For her portrayal of Elizabeth, the wife of King George VI, she also received Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® nominations, and won BAFTA and British Independent Film Awards. Additionally, the stars of “The King’s Speech” won a SAG Award® for Outstanding Motion Picture Cast.

Bonham Carter also recently garnered a Golden Globe nomination and won an Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for her performance as Mrs. Lovett in Tim Burton’s 2009 screen adaptation of the Stephen Sondheim musical “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street,” opposite Johnny Depp in the title role. In 2010, she reteamed with Burton and Depp for the fantastical adventure hit “Alice in Wonderland.” They are currently reunited on the thriller “Dark Shadows,” based on the cult classic television series and slated for release in 2012.

Bonham Carter was honored with her first Oscar® nod, as well as Golden Globe, BAFTA Award and SAG Award® nominations for her work in the 1997 romantic period drama “The Wings of the Dove,” based on the novel by Henry James. Her performance in that film also brought her Best Actress Awards from a number of critics organizations, including the Los Angeles Film Critics, Broadcast Film Critics, National Board of Review and London Film Critics’ Circle.

She had made her feature film debut in 1986 in the title role of Trevor Nunn’s historical biopic “Lady Jane.” She had barely wrapped production on that film when director James Ivory offered her the lead in “A Room with a View,” based on the book by E.M. Forster. She went on to receive acclaim in two more screen adaptations of Forster novels: Charles Sturridge’s “Where Angels Fear to Tread” and James Ivory’s “Howard’s End,” for which she earned her first BAFTA Award nomination.

Bonham Carter’s early film work also includes Franco Zeffirelli’s “Hamlet,” opposite Mel Gibson; “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” directed by and starring Kenneth Branagh; Woody Allen’s “Mighty Aphrodite”; and “Twelfth Night,” reuniting her with Trevor Nunn.

She went on to star in David Fincher’s “Fight Club,” with Brad Pitt and Edward Norton; the Tim Burton-directed films “Big Fish,” “Planet of the Apes” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”; and the actioner “Terminator Salvation,” directed by McG. In addition, she has starred in such independent features as “Novocaine,” “The Heart of Me,” “Till Human Voices Wake Us” and “Conversations with Other Women.” She also lent her voice to the animated features “Carnivale”; Tim Burton’s “Corpse Bride,” in the title role; and the Oscar®-winning “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit.”

On the small screen, Bonham Carter earned both Emmy and Golden Globe Award nominations for her performances in the telefilm “Live from Baghdad” and the miniseries “Merlin,” and a Golden Globe nomination for her portrayal of Marina Oswald in the miniseries “Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald.” She also starred as Anne Boleyn in the British miniseries “Henry VIII,” and as the mother of seven children, including four autistic sons, in the BBC telefilm “Magnificent 7.” More recently, she starred in the BBC biopic “Enid,” playing renowned children’s storyteller Enid Blyton.

Bonham Carter’s stage credits include productions of “The Woman in White,” “The Chalk Garden,” “The House of Bernarda Alba” and “Trelawny of the Wells,” to name a few.

 

ROBBIE COLTRANE appears as Rubeus Hagrid, Hogwarts’ beloved caretaker, the character he has played in every one of the Harry Potter films. He earned BAFTA Award and Los Angeles Film Critics Circle Award nominations for his performance in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” He reprised his role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and, finally, the two-part “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.”

Coltrane will next be heard in the animated feature “Brave,” due out next summer. His list of film credits also includes “The Brothers Bloom”; Steven Soderbergh’s “Ocean’s Twelve”; the Stephen Sommers-directed films “Van Helsing” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”; the Hughes brothers’ “From Hell”; the James Bond films “The World is Not Enough” and “Goldeneye”; Luis Mandoki’s “Message in a Bottle”; “Buddy”; “The Pope Must Die”; “Nuns on the Run,” for which he won the Peter Sellers Comedy Award at the 1991 Evening Standard British Film Awards; Kenneth Branagh’s “Henry V”; “Let It Ride”; Carl Reiner’s “Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool”; “Mona Lisa,” directed by Neil Jordan; “Absolute Beginners”; and “Defense of the Realm.”

He is perhaps best known for his work in the award-winning and internationally popular television series “Cracker,” which has also spawned several television movies, the latest airing in Fall 2006. His portrayal of the tough, wisecracking police psychologist Dr. Eddie “Fitz” Fitzgerald brought Coltrane numerous acting honors, including three consecutive BAFTA Awards for Best Television Actor, in 1994, 1995 and 1996; the Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Television Actor in 1993; a Silver Nymph Award for Best Actor at the 1994 Monte Carlo Television Festival; the Royal Television Society Award for Best Male Performer in 1994; FIPA’s Best Actor Award; and a Cable ACE Award for Best Actor in a Movie or Miniseries.

Coltrane first gained popularity in the early 1980s for his comedy appearances on such shows as “Alfresco,” “Kick Up the Eighties,” “Laugh??? I Nearly Paid My Licence Fee” and “Saturday Night Live.” He went on to star in 13 “Comic Strip” productions and numerous television shows, including “Blackadder the Third” and “Blackadder’s Christmas Carol.” He received a BAFTA Award nomination for his portrayal of Danny McGlone in the series “Tutti Frutti.” His other television credits include the ITV miniseries “Murderland,” and the telefilms “The Ebb-Tide,” “Alice in Wonderland,” and “The Planman,” which he also executive produced.

In 2006, Coltrane was awarded the OBE for his Services to Drama.

 

WARWICK DAVIS plays the dual roles of the goblin Griphook and Hogwarts Professor Filius Flitwick. He previously appeared as Griphook in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1,” although he is better known to audiences as Professor Flitwick, having played that character in all of the previous Harry Potter films.

Davis is currently filming the fantasy adventure “Jack the Giant Killer,” being directed by Bryan Singer and slated for release in Summer 2012.

Davis began his acting career in the role of Wicket in the “Star Wars” movie “Return of the Jedi.” He was next seen in the film “Labyrinth,” followed by Ron Howard’s internationally successful adventure “Willow,” playing the title role, which was written specifically for Davis.

More recently, Davis appeared in “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian”; “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”; and the biopic “Ray,” playing the role of Oberon, the MC in the jazz club that held the first appearance of Ray Charles. Among his other film credits are “Leprechaun” and its sequels; “The White Pony”; “The New Adventures of Pinocchio”; “Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace”; “A Very Unlucky Leprechaun”; and “Prince Valiant.”

His television work includes an appearance with Daniel Radcliffe in Ricky Gervais’ series “Extras”; “Snow White: The Fairest of Them All”; “Carrie & Barry”; “Dr. Terrible’s House of Horrible”; “Murder Rooms: Mysteries of the Real Sherlock Holmes”; “The 10th Kingdom”; “Gulliver’s Travels”; “The Silver Chair”; and “Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader.” He earlier reprised the role of Wicket in the television movies “The Ewok Adventure” and “Ewoks: Battle for Endor.”

A seasoned theatre actor in the UK, Davis has been featured in productions of “Snow White,” “Peter Pan” and “Aladdin.”

 

RALPH FIENNES plays the evil Lord Voldemort, one of the most terrifying villains in modern literature and cinema. He made his first appearance as Voldemort in 2005’s “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” Fiennes returned to the role in the 2007 blockbuster “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and again in last year’s “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

In 2010, Fiennes also starred in “Clash of the Titans,” with Liam Neeson and Sam Worthington. He reprises his role in the upcoming “Clash of the Titans 2,” which will be released in 2012.

Fiennes recently made his feature film directorial debut with a contemporary version of Shakespeare’s political thriller “Coriolanus,” in which he also stars with Gerard Butler and Vanessa Redgrave. The film is slated to open in the U.S. later this year, and then in the UK in January 2012.

Fiennes has been honored with two Academy Award® nominations, the first coming in 1994 for his performance in Steven Spielberg’s Oscar®-winning Best Picture, “Schindler’s List.” Fiennes’ chilling portrayal of Nazi Commandant Amon Goeth also brought him a Golden Globe nomination and a BAFTA Award, as well as Best Supporting Actor honors from numerous critics groups, including the National Society of Film Critics, and the New York, Chicago, Boston and London Film Critics associations. Four years later, Fiennes earned his second Oscar® nomination, for Best Actor, in another Best Picture winner, Anthony Minghella’s “The English Patient.” He also garnered Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations, as well as two Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® nominations, one for Best Actor and another shared with the film’s ensemble cast.

In addition, Fiennes won a British Independent Film Award, an Evening Standard British Film Award and a London Film Critics’ Circle Award and earned a BAFTA Award nomination for his work in the 2005 drama “The Constant Gardener,” directed by Fernando Meirelles. In 2008, he received dual British Independent Film Award nominations, both for Best Supporting Actor, for his performances in “The Duchess,” for which he also received a Golden Globe nomination, and “In Bruges.” In addition, he earned Emmy, Golden Globe and SAG Award® nominations for his work in the HBO movie “Bernard and Doris,” opposite Susan Sarandon.

His long list of film credits also includes the award-winning drama “The Reader,” with Kate Winslet; Kathryn Bigelow’s Oscar®-winning “The Hurt Locker”; James Ivory’s “The White Countess”; Aardman’s Oscar®-winning animated film “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit”; “Red Dragon”; the Neil Jordan-directed films “The End of the Affair” and “The Good Thief”; David Cronenberg’s “Spider”; Martha Fiennes’ “Chromophobia” and “Onegin”; István Szabó’s “Sunshine”; “Maid in Manhattan”; the animated “The Prince of Egypt”; “The Avengers”; “Oscar and Lucinda”; Bigelow’s “Strange Days”; Robert Redford’s “Quiz Show”; and “Wuthering Heights,” which marked his film debut.

A graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, Fiennes began his career on the London stage, including two seasons with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). In 1995, Fiennes opened as Hamlet in Jonathan Kent’s production of the Shakespeare play, winning a Tony Award when the production moved to Broadway. His subsequent theatre credits include “Ivanov,” again under Kent’s direction; the title roles of Shakespeare’s “Richard II” and “Coriolanus”; Christopher Hampton’s “The Talking Cure,” in which he originated the role of Carl Jung; the title role in Ibsen’s “Brand” at the RSC; and “Julius Caesar,” playing Mark Anthony.

In 2006, he reunited with Jonathan Kent to star in Brian Friel’s “Faith Healer,” which opened in Dublin before moving to Broadway, where Fiennes earned a Tony nomination for his performance. In 2008, Fiennes starred in the West End debut of Yasmina Reza’s play “God of Carnage.” Later that year, he starred in Samuel Beckett’s one-man show, “First Love,” at New York’s Lincoln Center, followed by Kent’s production of “Oedipus,” at the National Theatre in London. In August 2011, Fiennes returns to the West End to star as Prospero in Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” under the direction of Trevor Nunn.

 

MICHAEL GAMBON returns as Professor Albus Dumbledore, the role he played in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.”

Gambon has been honored for his work on the stage, screen and television, recently earning Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® and Critics’ Choice Award nominations as part of the cast of “The King’s Speech.” He previously shared in SAG Award® and Critics’ Choice Award wins, in the ensemble acting category, for Robert Altman’s “Gosford Park.” He has won four BAFTA TV Awards, for his performances in the longform projects “Perfect Strangers”; “Longitude”; “Wives and Daughters,” for which he also won a Royal Television Society (RTS) Award; and “The Singing Detective,” also winning RTS and Broadcast Press Guild Awards for his work in the title role of the last. Gambon also received Emmy and Golden Globe Award nominations for his portrayal of President Lyndon Baines Johnson in the HBO movie “Path to War.” In 2010, he was again Emmy-nominated for his role in the BBC miniseries “Emma.” In 1998, Gambon was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for services to theatre.

Gambon will next be seen in “Page Eight,” written and directed by David Hare. His additional film credits include “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” “The Book of Eli,” “Brideshead Revisited,” Jake Paltrow’s “The Good Night,” Robert De Niro’s drama “The Good Shepherd,” the remake of “The Omen,” Wes Anderson’s “The Life Aquatic,” “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow,” “Sylvia,” “Open Range,” “The Insider,” Tim Burton’s “Sleepy Hollow,” “The Last September,” “Dancing at Lughnasa,” “The Gambler,” “The Wings of the Dove” and “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover.”

Among his other television credits are HBO’s award-winning miniseries “Angels in America,” directed by Mike Nichols; the BBC miniseries “Masterpiece Theatre: Cranford”; and the HBO movie “Joe’s Palace.”

A native of Ireland, Gambon began his career with the Edwards-MacLiammoir Gate Theatre in Dublin. In 1963, he was one of the original members of the National Theatre Company at the Old Vic under Laurence Olivier, and later joined the Birmingham Rep, where he played “Othello.” His theatre repertoire also encompasses numerous productions in London’s West End, including Simon Gray’s “Otherwise Engaged”; the London premieres of the Alan Ayckbourn plays “The Norman Conquests,” “Just Between Ourselves” and “Man of the Moment”; “Alice’s Boys”; Harold Pinter’s “Old Times”; the title role in “Uncle Vanya”; and “Veterans Day” with Jack Lemmon. In 1987, he won several awards, including an Olivier Award for Best Actor, for his performance in the London revival of Arthur Miller’s “A View from the Bridge.”

With the Royal National Theatre (RNT), Gambon had major roles in the premieres of Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal” and “Mountain Language”; Simon Gray’s “Close of Play”; Christopher Hampton’s “Tales from Hollywood”; three more Alan Ayckbourn plays, “Sisterly Feelings” “A Chorus of Disapproval,” for which he won an Olivier Award, and “A Small Family Business”; and David Hare’s “Skylight,” which moved on to the West End and Broadway. Also with the RNT, Gambon did “Endgame,” and played Falstaff in “Henry IV, Parts I and II.” His later stage work includes lead roles in “Volpone,” for which he won an Evening Standard Award; Nicholas Hytner’s production of “Cressida,” at the Almeida; Patrick Marber’s production of “Caretaker” in the West End; and Stephen Daldry’s production of “A Number” at The Royal Court Theatre.

 

CIARÁN HINDS joins the cast in the role of Aberforth Dumbledore, brother of Hogwarts’ late headmaster Albus Dumbledore.

Earlier this year, Hinds co-starred with Anthony Hopkins in the psychological thriller “The Rite.” His upcoming film credits include the remake of “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy”; the thriller “The Woman in Black”; the action fantasy “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance”; and “John Carter of Mars.”

In 2009, Hinds won the Best Actor Award at the Tribeca Film Festival for his performance in “The Eclipse.” He also won a Career Achievement Award at the 2010 Dublin Film Festival. His recent film work also includes “Life During Wartime,” “Race to Witch Mountain,” “Stop-Loss,” “Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day,” “There Will Be Blood,” “Margot at the Wedding,” “The Nativity Story” and “Amazing Grace.” He also co-starred with Eric Bana and Daniel Craig in Steven Spielberg’s controversial true-life drama “Munich.” In addition, Hinds starred on the HBO series “Rome,” earning an Irish Film and Television Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Julius Caesar.

His previous film credits include “Calendar Girls,” “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life,” “Veronica Guerin,” “Road to Perdition,” “The Sum of All Fears,” “Titanic Town,” “Oscar and Lucinda,” “Some Mother’s Son,” “Circle of Friends,” and the Arthurian epic “Excalibur,” in which he made his feature film debut.

Hinds started acting on the stages of his native Northern Ireland and worked extensively at the Glasgow Citizens’ Theatre. He went on to become a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, where he starred in such plays as “The Last Days of Don Juan,” “Troilus and Cressida,” “Edward II,” and “Richard III,” playing the titular role.

 

JASON ISAACS returns as Lucius Malfoy, the once-supercilious Death Eater he previously played in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

Isaacs has been cast as the male lead in the new NBC drama “Awake,” which he will also be producing. The series starts filming in Los Angeles this August. Also upcoming, Isaacs co-stars with Taylor Lautner and Maria Bello in the John Singleton-directed feature “Abduction,” slated to open in September.

He recently co-starred with Matt Damon in Paul Greengrass’s action thriller “Green Zone,” and starred in the indie film “Skeletons.” In addition, he lent his voice to the animated “Cars 2” and the video “Green Lantern: Emerald Knights,” both out this summer. On television, he just appeared in the BBC miniseries “Case Histories,” based on the best-selling Kate Atkinson crime novels, in which he plays her iconic detective Jackson Brodie.

In 2008, Isaacs starred in and executive produced the Nazi-themed drama “Good,” for which he earned a London Film Critics’ Circle Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. His recent acting honors also include a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor for his work in the BBC miniseries “The State Within,” and a BAFTA TV Award nomination for Best Actor for his role in the BBC telefilm “The Curse of Steptoe.”

Isaacs first gained fame in 2000 for his portrayal of the cruel Colonel William Tavington in Roland Emmerich’s “The Patriot,” which brought him a London Film Critics’ Circle Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. In 2001, he played a drag queen in the remake of “Sweet November,” and was equally unrecognizable as the bullet-headed Captain Mike Steele in Ridley Scott’s war drama “Black Hawk Down.” He went on to star in John Woo’s World War II drama “Windtalkers,” the romantic comedy “Passionada,” and the Jackie Chan action comedy “The Tuxedo.” In 2003, he played the dual roles of Captain Hook and Mr. Darling in P.J. Hogan’s live-action “Peter Pan.”

Isaacs has also made several movies with director Paul Anderson, appearing in “Event Horizon,” “Soldier” and “Shopping,” as well as in a cameo in “Resident Evil.” His other credits include “The End of the Affair,” “Armageddon” and “Dragonheart,” as well as the independent features “Friends with Money,” “Tennis, Anyone?,” “The Chumscrubber,” “Nine Lives,” “Hotel,” “The Last Minute” and “Divorcing Jack.”

On the small screen, Isaacs starred for three seasons in the Peabody Award-winning Showtime series “Brotherhood.” His other television work includes the Channel 4 telefilm “Scars,” a recurring role on “The West Wing,” and a guest appearance on “Entourage.” Early in his career, he starred for two seasons on the hit British series “Capital City,” and was also seen in the controversial BBC miniseries “Civvies.”

On the stage, he created the role of Louis in the Royal National Theatre production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Angels in America – Parts 1 & 2.” He has appeared at five Edinburgh Festivals, and in a number of productions in London’s West End, including the recent revival of Harold Pinter’s “The Dumb Waiter.”

Born in Liverpool, England, Isaacs attended Bristol University, where he directed and/or starred in more than 20 theatre productions. He went on to graduate from London’s prestigious Central School of Speech and Drama.

 

HELEN McCRORY appears as Narcissa Malfoy, whose loyalty to the Dark Lord is tested by her love for her son, Draco. She previously played the role in “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

McCrory most recently completed work on “Hugo Cabret,” directed by Martin Scorsese and due out this November. In 2006, she played Cherie Blair, opposite Michael Sheen as Tony Blair, in the award-winning true-life drama “The Queen,” earning a London Film Critics’ Circle Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal. She and Sheen again played Cherie and Tony Blair in the acclaimed 2010 HBO movie “The Special Relationship.” McCrory’s other recent film credits include Julian Jarrold’s “Becoming Jane”; “Flashbacks of a Fool,” opposite Daniel Craig; the animated “Fantastic Mr. Fox”; and the thriller “4. 3. 2. 1.”

Born in London, McCrory began her career on the stage. She won a Manchester Evening News Award for Best Actress for her work in “Blood Wedding,” and an Ian Charleson Award for her performance as Rose Trelawney in “Trelawney of the Wells.” Her subsequent honors include London Evening Standard Award nomination for her work in Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya,” and an Olivier Award nomination for her performance as Rosalind in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.”

McCrory has also been recognized for her extensive work on British television, including a Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress for her role on the series “North Square.” Her additional television work includes the title roles in the longform projects “Anna Karenina” and “Carla”; the miniseries “The Jury” and “The Last King”; and the series “Life.”

McCrory made her feature film debut in Neil Jordan’s “Interview with the Vampire.” She first gained attention for her work in the BBC Wales telefilm “Streetlife,” winning a number of awards, including a Welsh BAFTA Award, Monte Carlo TV Festival Award and a Royal Television Society Best Actress Award. Her other film credits include Gillian Armstrong’s “Charlotte Gray,” with Cate Blanchett; Kevin Reynolds’ “The Count of Monte Cristo”; Roger Michell’s “Enduring Love,” with Daniel Craig; and Lasse Hallstroem’s “Casanova,” starring Heath Ledger.

 

ALAN RICKMAN portrays the enigmatic Severus Snape, the former potions professor, who is now Hogwarts’ headmaster. He originated the role of Snape in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” and has played the character in all of the Harry Potter movies.

Rickman next stars with Colin Firth and Cameron Diaz in Michael Hoffman’s crime comedy “Gambit,” written by the Coen brothers. He also returns to Broadway this November to star in the world premiere of Theresa Rebeck’s play “Seminar.”

Rickman was already an award-winning stage actor in his native England when he made his feature film debut in the 1988 action blockbuster “Die Hard.” Since then, he has repeatedly been honored for his work on the screen.

In 1992, he won a BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of the Sheriff of Nottingham in “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves,” and also earned a second BAFTA Award nomination, for Best Actor, for his role in Anthony Minghella’s “Truly Madly Deeply.” Also that year, he won both the Evening Standard British Film Award and the London Film Critics’ Circle Award for his work in those two films as well as Stephen Poliakoff’s “Close My Eyes,” with the London Film Critics’ Circle adding his performance in “Quigley Down Under” for good measure. Rickman later earned BAFTA Award nominations for his performances in Ang Lee’s “Sense and Sensibility” and Neil Jordan’s “Michael Collins.”

Rickman more recently starred as Judge Turpin in Tim Burton’s film version of the Stephen Sondheim musical “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” He reunited with Burton to provide the voice of the Blue Caterpillar in the 2010 fantasy hit “Alice in Wonderland.” His additional film credits include “Bottle Shock,” for which he won the Best Actor Award at the 2008 Seattle Film Festival; “Nobel Son”; “Perfume: The Story of a Murderer”; “Snow Cake”; “Love Actually”; “Blow Dry”; “Galaxy Quest”; “Dogma”; “Judas Kiss”; and “Mesmer,” for which he was named Best Actor at the 1994 Montreal Film Festival.

On the small screen, he won Emmy, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards® for his work in the title role of HBO’s “Rasputin.” He received another Emmy nomination for his starring role in the 2004 HBO movie “Something the Lord Made.” Last year, he starred with Emma Thompson in the BBC telefilm “The Song of Lunch.”

In 1997, Rickman made his feature film directorial debut with “The Winter Guest,” starring Emma Thompson, which he also scripted with Sharman Macdonald, based on Macdonald’s original play. An official selection at the Venice Film Festival, the movie was nominated for a Golden Lion and won three other awards, and was later named Best Film at the 1997 Chicago Film Festival. Rickman also directed the play version of “The Winter Guest” for the British stage. In addition, he directed “My Name is Rachel Corrie” in the West End, winning Best New Play and Best Director at the Theatregoers’ Choice Awards before the production transferred to New York. He recently directed a production of August Strindberg’s “Creditors” at London’s Donmar Warehouse, which was also presented at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in April 2010.

Rickman studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art before joining the Royal Shakespeare Company for two seasons. In 1985, he created the role of the Vicomte de Valmont in “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” and, in 1987, he earned a Tony Award nomination when he reprised the role on Broadway. In 2001 and 2002, he starred in the West End production of Noel Coward’s “Private Lives,” for which he won a Variety Club Award and earned Olivier and Evening Standard Award nominations for Best Actor. Coming with the play to Broadway in 2002, Rickman received his second Tony nomination for Best Actor. He returned to the stage in Ibsen’s “John Gabriel Borkman,” which opened at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin before moving to the Brooklyn Academy earlier this year.

 

MAGGIE SMITH returns in the role of Hogwarts professor Minerva McGonagall, which she originated in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” She reprised her role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.”

Smith has been honored numerous times for her work on the stage, screen and television. A two-time Academy Award® winner, she won her first Oscar® for the title role in 1969’s “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” for which she also won a BAFTA Award and earned a Golden Globe Award nomination. A decade later, she won her second Oscar®, as well as Golden Globe and Evening Standard British Film Awards and a BAFTA Award nomination, for her role in “California Suite.” Smith earned her sixth and latest Oscar® nomination for her performance in Robert Altman’s “Gosford Park,” also receiving Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations and sharing in a Screen Actors Guild Award® and a Critics’ Choice Award as part of the ensemble cast.

Among her myriad film acting honors, Smith also garnered Oscar® nominations for her performances in “Othello,” “Travels with My Aunt” and “A Room with a View,” winning BAFTA and Golden Globe Awards for the last. In addition, she won BAFTA Awards for “Tea with Mussolini” and “A Private Function”; an Evening Standard British Film Award for James Ivory’s “Quartet”; and both BAFTA and Evening Standard British Film Awards for “The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne.”

Smith’s upcoming films include “Quartet,” being directed by Dustin Hoffman, and John Madden’s “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.” Her many other credits include “Gnomeo & Juliet,” “Nanny McPhee Returns,” “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood,” “The First Wives Club,” “Sister Act,” “The Secret Garden,” “Hook,” “Becoming Jane,” “The Last September,” “Washington Square,” “Richard III,” “The Missionary,” “Death on the Nile,” “Murder by Death” and “The Honey Pot.”

On television, she is starring in the ITV series “Downton Abbey,” which is airing in the U.S. on PBS. She earlier won an Emmy Award for her performance in the 2003 HBO movie “My House in Umbria.” In 2010, she received her fourth Emmy nomination for her work in the HBO movie “Capturing Mary.” She previously earned Emmy nods for her roles in the telefilms “Suddenly, Last Summer” and “David Copperfield,” gaining a BAFTA TV Award nomination for the latter. Additionally, she earned BAFTA TV Award nominations for the longform projects “Memento Mori,” “Mrs. Silly,” and “Talking Heads,” winning a Royal Television Society Award for the last.

Smith started acting on the stage in 1952 with the Oxford University Drama Society, and made her professional debut in New York in “The New Faces of 1956 Revue.” Three years later, she joined the Old Vic Company, where she won the 1962 Evening Standard’s Best Actress Award for her roles in “The Private Ear” and “The Public Eye.” Joining the National Theatre in 1963, Smith played Desdemona to Laurence Olivier’s “Othello.” Her notable appearances with the National Theatre also include productions of “Black Comedy,” “Miss Julie,” “The Country Wife,” “The Beaux Stratagem,” “Much Ado About Nothing” and “Hedda Gabler.”

Throughout her career, Smith has continued to appear on the stages of London and New York. She won a Tony Award for her performance in “Lettice and Lovage,” and had earlier received Tony Award nominations for “Night and Day” and “Private Lives.” She has also won Evening Standard Drama Awards for her performances in “Virginia” and “Three Tall Women.”

Smith became a Dame of the British Empire in 1990. She is also a Fellow of the British Film Institute, and, in 1993, won a BAFTA Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

JULIE WALTERS reprises her role as the maternal Mrs. Molly Weasley, the character she has portrayed in every one of the Harry Potter blockbusters.

A two-time Academy Award® nominee, Walters gained her first nomination in 1984 for her feature film debut in the title role of “Educating Rita,” also winning BAFTA and Golden Globe Awards for her performance. She earned her second Oscar® nod for her work in Stephen Daldry’s “Billy Elliot.” Her portrayal of Billy’s ballet teacher in that film also brought her BAFTA, Empire, Evening Standard Film and London Film Critics’ Circle Awards, in addition to Golden Globe and European Film Award nominations and two Screen Actors Guild Award® nominations, one for Supporting Actress and a second, shared with her castmates, for Outstanding Cast Performance. Walters has also earned BAFTA Award nominations for her roles in “Personal Services” and “Stepping Out,” winning a Variety Club Award for the latter.

Walters lends her voice to the upcoming animated feature “Brave,” and she was also heard in the recent animated hit “Gnomeo & Juliet.” In 2008, Walters co-starred with Meryl Streep in the smash hit musical “Mamma Mia!” Among her other credits are Julian Jarrold’s “Becoming Jane”; “Driving Lessons,” with her Harry Potter son Rupert Grint; “Wah-Wah”; “Calendar Girls”; “Before You Go”; Roger Michell’s “Titanic Town”; “Girls’ Night”; “Intimate Relations”; “Sister My Sister”; “Just Like a Woman”; “Buster”; and Stephen Frears’ “Prick Up Your Ears.”

Walters is also well known to British television audiences. In 2010, she earned dual BAFTA TV Award nominations, both in the category of Best Leading Actress, for the telefilms “A Short Stay in Switzerland” and “Mo,” winning for the latter. She previously won three consecutive BAFTA TV Awards, in 2002, 2003 and 2004, for her roles in “Strange Relations”; “Murder,” for which she also won a Royal Television Society Award; and the series “The Canterbury Tales,” also winning a Broadcasting Press Guild Award. She has received four more BAFTA TV Award nominations: in 1983, for the miniseries “Boys From the Blackstuff”; in 1987, for the series “Victoria Wood: As Seen on TV”; in 1994, for the telefilm “The Wedding Gift”; and in 1999, for the series “Dinnerladies.” Her many other television credits include “Filth: The Mary Whitehouse Story,” “The Ruby in the Smoke,” “Ahead of the Class,” “The Return,” “Oliver Twist,” “Jake’s Progress,” “Pat and Margaret,” “The Summer House,” “Julie Walters and Friends,” “Talking Heads” and “The Birthday Party.”

An accomplished stage actress, Walters won an Olivier Award in 2001 for her performance in Arthur Miller’s “All My Sons,” and was earlier nominated for an Olivier for her work in Sam Shepard’s “Fool for Love.” She had made her London stage debut in “Educating Rita,” creating the role that she would later bring to the screen. Her theatre credits also include productions of such plays as “Jumpers,” “Having a Ball,” “Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,” “When I was a Girl I Used to Scream and Shout,” Tennessee Williams’ “The Rose Tattoo” and the musical “Acorn Antiques.”

Apart from her acting roles, Walters’ first novel, Maggie’s Tree, was published in 2006. Her autobiography, That’s Another Story, was published in 2008.

 

TOM FELTON has played the role of Harry Potter’s nemesis and Slytherin leader, Draco Malfoy, in all of the Harry Potter films.

Felton has a wide range of films upcoming, including the supernatural thriller “The Apparition,” in which he stars with Ashley Greene and Sebastian Stan; the sci-fi actioner “Rise of the Apes,” a prequel to the “Planet of the Apes” story, with James Franco and Freida Pinto; and the indie sports drama “From the Rough,” based on the story of coach Santana Sparks, starring Taraji P. Henson.

Felton has been acting professionally since the age of nine, when he starred as Peagreen Clock in Peter Hewitt’s fantastical tale “The Borrowers.” The role brought him to the attention of director Andy Tennant, who cast Felton as Jodie Foster’s screen son, Louis Leonowens, in the epic 1999 feature “Anna and the King.”

Two years later, he landed the coveted part of Draco Malfoy in the first Harry Potter film, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” He went on to star as the character fans love to hate in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.” He has won two consecutive MTV Movie Awards in the category of Best Villain for his work in the last two films. He also had a cameo role in the comedy “Get Him to the Greek,” with Russell Brand.

In addition to his acting, Felton devotes time to his other passion, music. He taught himself to play guitar, and writes and performs his own songs.

 

MATTHEW LEWIS portrays Harry Potter’s faithful and courageous friend Neville Longbottom, who proves his mettle in the war against Lord Voldemort.

Lewis began acting when he was just five years old after joining a performing arts club. He won the part of Neville in 2001 when an open casting call for “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” was held in his hometown of Leeds. He returned to the role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.” In addition to the Harry Potter films, Lewis was seen in the 2010 indie film “The Sweet Shop.”

He has been also featured in a number of television series in the UK, including “Heart Beat,” “City Central,” “Where the Heart Is,” “Sharpe,” “Dalziel and Pascoe” and “Some Kind Of Life.”

On the stage, Lewis just completed a tour starring in Bill Kenwright’s production of Agatha Christie’s play “Verdict.”

 

EVANNA LYNCH made her acting debut in the role of Luna Lovegood in “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.” She reprised the part in “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

A native of Ireland, Lynch was already a dedicated Harry Potter fan when she won the role of Luna over 15,000 other young hopefuls through an open casting call in early 2006. Lynch’s affinity for the offbeat character caused her to stand out among the thousands of other girls and she ultimately landed the coveted role.

 

 

 

 

 

BONNIE WRIGHT plays the role of Ginny Weasley, the youngest of the Weasley siblings, who, in the most recent films has emerged as a courageous young witch, as well as Harry Potter’s love interest.

Wright was only ten years old when she first appeared as Ginny in 2001’s “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” Over the next decade, she literally grew up in the role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.”

Upcoming, Wright stars in two independent features: the anthology film “Geography of the Hapless Heart” and the thriller “The Philosophers.”

Her previous acting credits include several television productions, including the BBC telefilm “Agatha Christie: A Life in Pictures,” playing a young Agatha Christie. She also appeared in the adventure drama “Stranded,” a Hallmark production that aired in the U.S. and UK, and she lent her voice to an episode of the Disney Channel animated series “The Replacements.”

In addition to acting, Wright also has an affinity for music and plays both the guitar and saxophone.

 

Courtesy of Warner Brothers

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