NYC Actors: One Day Master Class with Kari Margolis – March 27th!

Don’t Miss This One Day Master Class with Award-Winning Theatre Artist Kari Margolis!

Take a theatrical journey to your creative core and merge the skill-sets of Actor, Director and Playwright.  Work intensively with Kari Margolis and Company members in an exciting, challenging yet highly supportive environment.  Learn to create on your feet and connect your voice to your movement.  Kari Margolis is internationally recognized as a leader in Actor training and her work has received six National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a NY “Bessie”, a Pew/TCG National Artist Fellowship, a Creative Capital National Artist Fellowship and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship among many other prestigious awards.  The Company will present  a work-in-progress presentation after the workshop.

Date: March 27th, 2011

Time: 10am to 4pm with a free theatrical demonstration at 5pm

Where: Actors Movement Studio, 302 West 37th Street, 6th floor

Cost: $100

To register: Email us at

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