Want to Be on TV? You Have to Watch TV!

It has always amazed me how much actors don’t know what is on television. Do you really think an agent or manager cares about booking you on a $100 a day film? They care about booking you on television. Why? Because that is where they make the most commission. I know most of you would love to be a film actor, but let’s be realistic folks, most of the film actors today started on television.

Also, know the television show you’re auditioning for. What is the format and tone? A lot of times you’ll be reading great, but no one will know how brilliant you are because you’re in a different show. Which is why you have to watch every show. If you want to be on television, you have to watch television. How are you going to have any points of reference if you don’t know what’s going on? Pick up TV Guide, subscribe to it and see who’s working. What are they wearing?

What are the popular hairstyles? If you don’t look like you’re on the show and act like you’re on the show, then why should they cast you on their show? Try not to extend the imagination of the people who are hiring you. Figure out how you can fit into the requirements of the given medium. It’s sad, but you can be the greatest actor in the world, but if they don’t see it with what they are casting, then you’re not going to get the part. It’s really that simple.

Do the research. Look up on IMDBpro the other shows the producers have worked on. If it’s an Aaron Sorkin show, then it’s a particular style that the network buys from him. Know what the casting director has worked on. What type of actors do they usually go for? The more information you have going in, the more powerful you are and the more able you are to get to the one percent booking.

When you get the audition, make sure that you’re prepared. Do you know exactly where you’re going? Map it out the night before. Lay out your clothes. Stay off the phone. If you’re still going over your script in your car on the way over and in the office, then you didn’t do enough homework. Don’t look at anyone in the outer office. The moment that you catch someone’s eye, they will talk to you.Bring music or put your head down and close your ears to all the noise and concentrate on what you’re going to do. Find out who is signed up before you and if you can, wait outside the room and go straight in as soon as they walk out. Do not engage.

Another thing, if you’re thinking about the audition for days after wards and asking for feedback from your representatives, then you didn’t do your homework. You know when you’ve hit it hard. You know when you’ve given it your best. You don’t need approval or feedback from anyone else about how you did. You know. Be honest with yourself.

Amy LyndonCheers.
Amy Lyndon
818.760.8501
http://thelyndontechnique.com/
TheLyndonTechnique@gmail.com

3 Comments

  1. soahc

    September 16, 2010 at 3:27 pm

    Well, I don’t have time to watch all the shows on TV.

    A casting director gave this same advice to

  2. Lance Carter

    September 16, 2010 at 3:36 pm

    You don’t have to watch them all the time… just try and catch at least one episode of each. Do you have a DVR or Hulu? That makes it easy!

  3. Alison

    February 2, 2011 at 7:26 pm

    what if i don’t like all the shows on tv?
    i have very specific taste and if im going to star in something it better be something i love and enjoy just as much as the fans.

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