Amy Lyndon on the ‘Realities Of The Acting Business’

Over the past several weeks I have been ridiculed for continuing to present to actors positive thoughts and “false hope” about working in the entertainment business given the state of affairs of SAG and the economy.  It has been said by a couple of naysayers that as a teacher it is my responsibility to make sure actors know the realities of the business and that they should get a “decent job” and not have hope to build their dream of becoming a successful actor.

In my honest opinion, artists have to live in their own reality in order to create.  If your creative funnel is mucked up with ugly negative junk, then how can you channel the writer or even experience a full thought and feeling?  Trust me, your representatives are there to buffer you from the realities of the business.  That has never been your job.

The entertainment business is built because of the creation of positive energy coupled with the knowledge of how everything works.  If artists were continually bombarded by the “realities of the business and world affairs,” then there would never be great contributions to the art world ever.  They’d be too depressed to create.

As a fellow actor, I too am continually faced with rejection and squashed feelings. The only difference is, I get back up, brush off my butt and get on the horse and ride again. If I let the realities get me down, don’t you think I would have quit long ago?  Why should artists be labeled as “not living in reality” because they don’t want to focus on the economic state of affairs in the world?

Since I am out there with you on a daily basis, I understand that there will always be someone asking, “are they paying you money on that project?” or “why can’t you just get on a show?” or “why aren’t you SAG yet?” or “how long is this crazy idea going to last?” or “when are you going to get a real job?” Seriously, the left brainers should live in their own world and leave the right brainers alone to create and entertain.  Where do these people think everyone goes to get away from all that depression?  They go to movies, they watch television, they go to the theater — get my point?

Always remember, the only way that you do not make it, is if you quit.  There I go being positive again.

Amy Lyndon

The Lyndon Technique
818.760.8501
coldreadingclasses@yahoo.com

http://www.coldreadingclasses.com

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